A cool browser keyboard shortcut

I am working on a big keyboard shortcut post for 4 November—International Keyboard Shortcut Day in 2015 ;-)—but in the mean time, I made a little discovery today that I felt I should share.

Some time ago, I wrote about learning keyboard shortcuts. And although I often fail, I do still try to practice what I preach (in fact, I have used three already in the first two paragraphs of this post—two for adding the hyperlinks and one for the italics).

In that previous post, I wrote that one way we often discover keyboard shortcuts is by accident—for example, when we press something on the keyboard we did not intend to. You may argue that that makes keyboard shortcuts dangerous—we intend pressing one thing, but press something else, and then we have something bad happen. I counter by pointing out that I am hard pressed to think of a keyboard shortcut for which the handy undo (Ctrl+Z) does not apply. Furthermore, and more to the point, the mouse is also dangerous, if not even more dangerous. I cannot think when I have caused “catastrophic” (i.e., unrecoverable, or at least hard-to-recover) damage with the keyboard, but I can think of several instances with the mouse. How many times have you dragged a file or an e-mail, and dropped it (accidentally, of course) into the wrong folder, and spent ages trying to find your now missing item? Enough said.

Today, I discovered another shortcut like that—I wanted to close a tab in Chrome, and instead of pressing Ctrl+F4, I pressed Ctrl+4 (just a little South of where I wanted to be…). Now when I have multiple browser tabs open (which is all of the time!), I navigate between tabs with the old faithful Ctrl+Tab (or Ctrl+Shift+Tab to reverse direction). However, through this fortuitous mistake, I discovered that when I have multiple tabs open, I can easily jump to a tab by pressing Ctrl+x, where x is the tab’s position number (from left to right). Yes, this will probably not work when you have a gazillion tabs open, but if you have a handful open that will allow you to count at a glance, this will halve the tab navigation time.I also tend to have some standard tabs open in standard positions (GMail, my website dashboard, etc.), so this will help me jump to those tabs very quickly from now on.

A little further testing has shown that the way this shortcut works is that Ctrl+1 through Ctrl+8 take you through the first 8 tabs, while Ctrl+9 handily takes you to the very last tab.

My next step was to immediately test it in other browsers, and I am happy to report that, like numerous other browser shortcuts (e.g., Ctrl+T to open a new tab, Alt+D to select the address bar), it works in Internet Explorer (I’ll test it in Edge later) and Firefox as well. So there you have it: One new shortcut in three new contexts.

So this is one small incremental improvement in productivity (made more so by the multiple browsers in which it works), but the important thing to remember with using keyboard shortcuts is that it all adds up—the gain from using one shortcut one time is minimal, but the gain from using many shortcuts multiple times is huge!

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